Banana/Blueberry/Egg Ingredients Poster PDFs

This gives a new twist to the concept of “All Natural” that I hadn’t though of!

Banana/Blueberry/Egg Ingredients Poster PDFs.

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Homemade Hot Dogs Fit for a Finicky Fanatic.


I don’t eat mystery meat. Forgive me if I am repeating myself. Perhaps to avoid repetition I should say  I still don’t eat mystery meat.

Precisely what do I mean by this epithet? It is probably best explained by example. The beloved hot dog is perhaps the quintessential example, with the possible exception of SPAM. If you take a mess of meat or poultry (with or without the addition of filler, chemicals, etc.) and turn it into an entirely different form, such as sausage, luncheon meats, nuggets, and so forth, this has the potential of being mystery meat. It is only saved if you know exactly what “meat” and amendments it is made with and you can reasonably vouch for its origins. Now the definition of “meat” is very broad on a commercial level. It’s much too broad for my eating comfort. You see, the USDA allows the processors of meat and poultry to leave in or on the ingredients and the end-product a certain amount of fecal matter, hair, bones, or just good ol’ generic “debris.” My fear of mystery meat caused me to give up hot dogs and bologna for a long while. Like I said, I just don’t eat mystery meat.

It may therefore surprise you to hear me say that I LOVE hot dogs. I really miss eating them freely whenever the mood strikes. But knowing what I know, I learned to turn up my nose and act disinterested when ever a hot dog opportunity arose. In truth, I am tortured at a baseball game: who can watch the game when all around me they are indulging. I have to walk quickly past the vendor outside the Home Depot. I absolutely have to avert my eyes when I am in New York City and just happen to walk the guy selling the Sabrette’s on the corner. Hot dog deprivation is a tough thing. But now, in exchange for some hard work, I don’t always have to do without hot dogs. I just have to make them for myself.

It is an arduous process requiring concentration and endurance. But it is well worth the energy. To begin, you need to find the right meat. Actually, that is probably the easiest part. Just go to your local farmer and get some pure, organic, grass-fed and finished, beef. Any lean cut will work. You are going to require some fat, too. The best kind of fat is the most solid and pure stuff you can procure. If you are into the all beef variety, this means you will need to buy a good brisket, to go with the lean stuff. Brisket has plenty of solid fat attached to it so you will be able to cut it up and portion out what you need. If you can, instead, get a clod of navel, even better. Navel is the belly of the cow – think bovine bacon. Either way, a batch of dogs requires about 4 pounds of lean meat and 1 pound 3 ounces of fat. If you are one of those “I never gain any weight no matter what I eat” kind of lucky duckies, feel free to up the fat portion by another 1/2 to 3/4 of a pound. Likewise, if you want more German style franks, add a pound of lean pork in place of the same amount of beef. Fancier yet, use good red veal.


Where it gets labor intensive is in the prep, the grinding and the processing. Oh, and then there is the stuffing. The meat must be ground separately from the fat. This happens only after both parts have been cut into small cubes and partially frozen. Freezing is required because otherwise it comes through the grinder all smushed and bruised, only to release its juice. You do want a juicy hot dog, don’t you? The ground fat is kept separate. After the first run through the grinder (I use a 3/4 hp grinder of the sort sold to hunters), the lean meat is mixed with a cure mix consisting of salt and pink salt (“instacure #1″). Both fat and meat then get spread out on cookie sheets separately and re-frozen for another 30-45 minutes to get it nice and “crunchy.” The crunchy stuff is ground a second time and now the fun begins.

After putting the twice ground meat and the fat in my fridge to keep it good and cold I make up my spice mix.

At this point I must digress. There are many recipes for hot dogs out there in the blogosphere and beyond. Every time I make hot dogs I review as many on-line choices as I can find and after I hit the books. I own at least 5 books with frankfurter recipes. Everyone is different. Oy! This time I made a list of all the various spices people recommend and the other dry ingredients. The latter includes non-fat dry milk, dextrose and soy products. The purpose of these is to bind and to help get the dogs to the right texture. All are varieties of processed foods. The easiest to procure (and pure enough for me) is the non-fat dry milk and it does its job like a charm. All you have to remember (and many recipes don’t tell you this) is to reduce that powdered milk to the consistency of confectioners sugar with your blender, food processor or (in my case) spice grinder. The spices include mace, marjoram, dry mustard, coriander, sweet paprika, granulated garlic, onion powder and white pepper. I left out the marjoram. I added about 10 grams of each except for the garlic and onion which I limited to 5 grams each. You can add more garlic if you like. No problem there but I am not a garlic lover. I put everything in my spice grinder and make it into a fine powder and then add back the dried milk. All of the dry ingredients are then mixed well together and weighed out into 4 equal portions.

So now starts the fun. Weigh out the meat and fat and divide it into 4 even batches. Using my food processors – yes I have 2 of them (my favorite is your basic Cuisinart DLC-7 and I also have a Cuisinart Elite a friend gave me) – I carefully process each batch of meat with 125 grams of crushed ice plus a portion of the spice mix until it is very well emulsified. At this point I take the temperature of the mix – it has to be 40 degrees F. No problem – the machine generates a bit of heat so the mixture gets to that temp fast. Now it is time to add the fat. The object of the exercise at this point is to have the meat molecules encapsulated by the fat in a beautiful emulsion.

The trick is to keep the temperature below 50F. Otherwise, your sausage will “break” and instead of hot dog, you’ll have dog food! Broken sausage has a very unpleasant texture that makes you leave it on your plate after the first bite. I know this from experience, trust me. The first time I made franks, I broke the mixture. It is also very embarrassing since it shows what a novice you are. The way to help ensure that you won’t break the emulsion is to add another 125 grams of crushed ice and pulse the machine to achieve perfection. If the emulsion becomes a little to hard to process, add a few tablespoons of ice water to get it moving. But get it moving only enough to achieve the incorporation of the fat so that it becomes one with the meat. (A Buddhist frankfurter?)

Put each batch in the tank of the stuffer while you process the rest of the dogs. (I have a 5 pound stuffer I bought at, you guessed it, the hunting supply store). Keep it in the fridge until you have finished preparing all of the batches.

Now let’s talk about sausage casing. All casings are not created equal. For the kosher style dog, you will need sheep casings. For the small-sized dog, you will need small sheep casings and for the jumbo dog hog casings will work fine. Be certain to soak them for hours and flush them 3-5 times through. You do this because they are packed in salt and the salt is nasty. Flushing out all the salt is also supposed to make the casings more tender. I have had problems with tough casings even though I do all of these things religiously, even though the instructions tell you to just soak them for 30 minutes! I think it is just the luck of the draw but I suspect that stuffing the links nice and tightly also helps. Finally, cook the dogs from the fridge, in cold liquid, and bring them slowly to a boil. This helps to tenderize the casings too. I like mine to “snap” when I big into them. I’m still working on this.

Stuff your casings. I’ll give you a lesson on this someday if you need it but for now I suggest that if you are really into it, buy Michael Ruhlman’s book Charcuterie. Make the links any size you like. It is totally a matter of personal preference. I like them on the short and fat side because I only want to eat one bun. Once stuffed, the dogs can either be poached or smoked, in any order. If you don’t have a smoker, I really don’t think it is the end of the world. Poach them in water that is flavored with liquid smoke, if you like that sort of thing, or use just plain water. The emulsion should have enough spices to give them plenty of flavor without the smoking. They only get smoked for a short while anyway – it took me just about one hour to bring mine up to the 140F required at that point.

Poaching is a little tricky because you do not want to boil them. Actually, you want to heat them up in water that is 180F and no hotter. Once you have brought them to the same temp as the water, they are ready to go. One way to do this is to use a slow cooker held at the right setting to achieve the desired temperature. You can do it on top of the stove too but this takes real vigilance and confidence in your stove. I don’t have that confidence since my stove doesn’t go very low. Enter the immersion circulator – the precision cooks tool that enables you to regulate the temperature of the water within a minuscule tolerance.

Still there are tricks. First, bring more water than you need up to temp with the circulator. Those of you with the Sous Vide Supreme can certainly use this, too. Fill the tank as high as you can – to the “max” line. Heat up the water to 180F. Meanwhile, place all of your dogs in a couple of big zip lock bags, leaving plenty of room. You are going to add the 180F water to the bag to cover the dogs. Then, carefully, very carefully, lower the partially closed bag into the sous vide vessel. As you do this you will watch as the sous vide water surrounds the contents of the zip lock bag and pushes out most of the air. While doing the lowering, slowly close the zipper the rest of the way until the air is pushed out and the bag is fully immersed in the sous vide vessel. If you need to, you can put a pot lid on top of the bag to make certain it is fully immersed in the water. I use a heavy meat tenderizer I have and it works great for this purpose.

Since you put the water inside of the bag and the sous vide machine keeps it at temperature (after it has equalized in the bath), you are able to “poach” the links and bring them to the desired temperature in about one hour. Use your meat thermometer to test a random dog in one of the bags, just to be sure.

When you have determined that the sausage is at the right temp, remove them from the water bath, place the bag in the sink and cut off one corner to let the hot water drain off quickly. Immediately put the drained dogs in an ice bath (50/50 water and ice) to cool them down as fast as possible. Add more ice if needed. Once they are well cooled, take them out and let them dry off a bit. I package mine with the food saver making sure there is a little space between each dog. That way I can remove one at a time for my eating pleasure. They will keep in the freezer for many months – if they last that long.

To be certain, this is a lot of work and it takes a great deal of time. I made about 30 big fat dogs in about 6 hours. It goes faster if you have help. It goes even faster still if you have good equipment. Also, you could cut the recipe in half if you just want to give it a try or you don’t have the patience.

For this fanatic, making my own frankfurters fills a sorely missed hot dog hankering.

Special note: Yes folks, I am back. I am well. I am sorry to have kept you all waiting. Please forgive me.

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Filed under Charcuterie, Cooking, Hot Dogs, Sous Vide, sous vide cooking

Lucky Lobster Lover lives to eat her words…AND lobster, as well

In March, 2010, I put up a post on the subject of lobster (here). I discussed my “allergy” to it, how Mr. Homard (scientifically known as homarus americanus)  was one of my absolute favorite foods and how I believed I would never be able to eat it again. Today I am happy to report that I have overcome this intolerance. I am once again able to indulge in this luscious crustacean. “How did that happen?” you ask.

My inability to eat the stuff, really not an allergy at all, was on account of a badly diseased gall bladder. I had my strong suspicions about this angry organ for nearly 20 years.  That was when it first started bothering me. Fortunately, during the first 10 years, it  would attack me only on a rare occasion. After a good night’s rest with the help of the sleeping pill du jour,  I could mostly ignore the problem. However, for the last 10 years, it increasingly got louder; the attacks became more frequent. I eliminated avocado from my diet (another food I adore) because it always stirred up trouble for me. Other things were eliminated when I could link them to the pain.

I’m really no hero. It is just that whenever I would go with my symptoms to a doctor I would be told to go away. Yes, after poking and prodding me and taking a picture (ultra-sonically) of my gut, I would be told that although it sounded like my gall bladder, it seemed to have passed. This happened three times. I always knew it would be back. I just never knew when. Worse yet, I had no idea what I would be forced to eliminate from my diet next.

Several years ago I realized, after four trys, that every time I ate lobster my diseased organ unleashed it’s tremendous wrath inside my gut. Now lobster was out and this really pissed me off. Still, I put off returning to the doctors, only to be sent away once again.

Finally, the thing became acute. This time I was determined not to let the attack pass without seeking medical attention mid attack. Not to worry. The “attack” became a massive siege. I actually had all the time I needed since the agony would not subside. I spent a miserable week in New York. Even a small burger without the fries at the Shake Shack  had me bent over clutching my waist. It seemed eating anything was a problem.  As we drove home from the airport, I turned to my darling and said “take me to the hospital.” This time, sure enough, the diagnostics backed me up.

 At the risk of  TMI, I’ll tell you that my gall bladder was actually 97% dead! Yep, completely non-functioning but thankfully not gangrenous. It had to be yanked. This was a very welcome determination. Though for me the procedure was not easy to recover from, eventually I regained much improved digestive health. A big reward for a lot of suffering. Little by little, I am thrilled to report, that I was able to reintroduce every single eliminated food back into my diet.

Lobster is the one I rejoice in the most.

I love the concept of “butter poaching” just about anything. So, when I read on eGullet all about how people were doing it with lobster in their sous vide machines, my mouth watered. Yes, yes, I am a hardcore locavore and lobster certainly does not fit the test. But, fanatic be damned, one has to make reasonable exceptions especially for the things one loves…especially for the things one has been deprived of for so many years.

In Costco of all places I spied these gargantuan tails and impulsively decided one of these guys would be a good place to start my experimentation. After all, if I blew 20 bucks and didn’t have to wrestle to pull it out of the shell, I wouldn’t be so bummed if my first sous vide go around with lobster came out terrible.

I forgot to get a photo of the tail before I yanked it from its shell, but you know what a lobster tail looks like, right? Just imagine a HUGE one. The thing was a full 10 inches long and weighed a full pound! This must have come from a relatively old lobster. Attached to its body I would speculate that this fellow must have weighed at least 3 pounds.

In sous vide cooking, you don’t put the lobster in the bag still in its shell because of the risk of piercing the bag and making a mess of your sous vide machine. At the open end of the tail, I took my flower shears (yes, smarty pants, I cleaned them first) and began clipping the bones on the underside, one by one, right up the middle. Then I took my thumbs, placed them on either side of the tail with the cut bones up, and gave the thing a good strong pinch backward to expose the raw meat inside. A solid but gentle pull of a fork freed the meat in one big piece. The meat alone was at least 2 1/2 inches in diameter!

Here is a photo of the tail meat after it was bagged. Yes, that IS an entire stick of butter in there with the seafood. Now I am one of those weird people who does not dip my lobster in butter before stuffing it down my gullet.Perhaps this is why the tail is not my favorite part since it usually comes out so dry. But butter poaching is a horse of a different color. When you butter poach a protein such as this, the butter does not get infused into the substance. The butter simply serves to keep the meat nice and soft and totally moist. Once out of the poaching medium, most of the butter remains behind – these are not the calories one needs to be concerned with.

I left the bag in a 61 degree C water bath for 1 hour. Happily, the poaching medium that was  left over after the lobster was cooked, was infused with lobstery deliciousness which had to be used somehow.

Rice was my choice, other than French fries, the perfect accompaniment for this peasant seafood. I put the lobster in a ziplock bag, without the butter, and set it back in the Sous Vide rig to stay warm. This is one of the beautiful things about Sous Vide – the temperature never goes higher than you set it to so holding food during prep is no issue. Meanwhile, I sautéed some arborio rice in the lobster butter. For the liquid, I used a simple chicken stock amended with a healthy dose of puréed preserved lemon, a dash of nutmeg, a little white pepper and some kosher salt. The lemon provided plenty of contrast in flavor for the rice, even though it was cooked with the lobster butter.

When the rice was ready for serving, I took the lobster out, trimmed the ends (which got sent back into the rice) and sliced it in neat 1/2 inch disks. On the plate, I drizzled a tiny bit of the remaining lobster butter and garnished the plate with parsley. Plain and simple, but lobster really doesn’t need to be anything else.

In truth, I really expected to be disappointed and much to my thrill and surprise, the lobster was moist and succulent. It was not overly tender as I had feared and although it was not from the best of sources, it was sufficiently fresh and flavorful. I suppose that with today’s flash freezing methods, a decent commercial product really is made possible.

I enjoyed every last bite and suffered no pain for the indulgence.

Thanks for reading and thanks for everyone’s support during my long absence from this blog. I hope to have a number of interesting posts coming your way on a regular basis very soon.

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Filed under Cooking, Lobster, Sous Vide, sous vide cooking

Wicked and Wonderful: I would serve these crispy cereal treats to company

Ok, people, STAND BACK, perhaps even avert your eyes. If you have a weakness for any kind of sweets, then actually, you had just better STAY AWAY: click that mouse and go somewhere else. But, whatever you do, DON’T read this little post.

I read a tremendous number of blogs. I read perhaps a hundred or more posts each week. It is my hobby. Oh yes, I am also somewhat food obsessed and I love to read anything about food. Most of all, I learn tons as I read these articles (although I remember only a fraction of it). When you are my age, keeping the brain set to “on” is very important.

Among the blogs I read, like so many other foodie folks, Smitten Kitchen keeps me coming back, again and again. I feel like I know Deb Perelman: we have much in common though she is half my age (I’m sure of it) has a small child (mine – step children, at that, are late and mid-teen) and she lives in New York (I am just a wannabe New Yorker – 261 days and counting). Deb knows desserts and every time I follow her lead, I am lavishly rewarded.

I don’t make too many desserts because I have an obese person inside of me who is always fighting to get out. Skipping dessert is one way I have of not letting her win the battle. Also, neither my wonderful, loving, adorable, angelic and doting step-daughter nor Bob are much into sweets. One exception comes in the form of Rice Krispy treats. Anyone can make these, right? Wrong.

The first time I made these (what I believe are cloyingly sweet) goodies for them I was completely humiliated. I made the most grievous error a cook can make, or so I was told. I USED MARSHMALLOW CREME instead of actual marshmallows. I confess, I don’t really love this confection so I really didn’t think the back-of-the-box recipe was sacrosanct. I spied the creme on the shelf and I thought it would distribute through the cereal more readily. I matched the quantity called for in the recipe by weight and bought the stuff. Bad, bad step-mother!!! I was shamed by my traditionalist family and I vowed never to make these things again.

But then a couple of weeks ago I found a post that Deb had written about a new twist on the old RC Treats. She convinced me that I should try again. Double the butter Deb advised, and instead of just melting it and mixing in the marshmallows, brown the butter first! The brown butter, as we know, gets a really special nutty flavor. You have to take care to get the milk solids to just the right doneness, as indicated by color. Stirring and scraping the bottom of the pan as the butter cooks will do the trick and will help keep the particles from sticking to your pan. Go for a good pecan shade of brown. You must be very careful because brown butter can turn to burnt butter very quickly. But, if you continually stir and resist the temptation to speed the process by turning up the heat too high, you will get it right.

But wait, there is one more twist on the B-O-B recipe. At the very end, add sea salt (or kosher salt) as you stir the sticky liquid in with the cereal. Brilliant! Deb says to use a 1/4 tsp of salt but, being a renegade, I used my salt grinder and did not actually measure. I like the combination of salt and sweet though I was careful to use a very light hand. Measure if you must, but I really think that Deb’s quarter teaspoon is not enough – you decide and, please, let me know what you think. Do your best to distribute the salt well throughout the mixture as you are combining the ingredients. A second person to help at this juncture will make the difference.

These things are totally seductive and truly wicked. The brown butter flavor comes right through and the lovely pecan colored particles give these otherwise generic appearing treats a nice touch of color. It is, however, the classic combination of sweet and salt added to that buttery nuttiness which makes them absolutely superlative. Best of all, this recipe conquers the cloying sweetness of the unaltered back-of-the-box dessert and elevates them to a much higher plane. I have visions of these new RCT’s appearing on the petit fours plates of fine restaurants everywhere. Well, maybe that is too much to imagine but I certainly will serve them to company.

Deb’s original post can be found here.

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Further Fine Food From Fat: BLTs with Locally Grown Tomatoes and Sprouts with Maple Cured Bacon

A friend of mine from Canada came to visit a couple of years ago and brought me one of those souvenir sets of typical Canadian condiments. You know, the kind of gift set you might find in a shop at the airport? Well, the present was well used. The condiments included two different bottles of delicious pure maple syrup and though I am not a lover of maple flavored things myself, the syrups were quickly consumed by the younger members of my family. The third item however went unused. It was a bottle of tiny lumps of maple sugar. Until a few weeks ago I must confess that had absolutely no idea what I was going to use this for. (I tried it on oatmeal and it didn’t do the trick for me.) Not being really suitable to put in the box for the next canned food drive, I stuck it in the back of the cabinet with the other sugars, salts, etc.

Then recently, when it was time to fortify my bacon supply, while hunting in the cupboards to find the ingredients for the cure mix, I came across the odd bottle of maple sugar. Serendipity is a wonderful thing! What could be better than maple cured bacon smoked over apple wood? Now I told you all about bacon curing in my post here, so I am not going to repeat myself. All I did differently was generously sprinkle the curing bacon with the maple sugar. (FYI, I could just as well have used regular real maple syrup.) As the bacon cured, the sugar dissolved and the meat was infused with the flavor. After an 8 day cure, a couple of days drying and an afternoon in the smoker where I used apple wood for the smoke, the bacon was ready to meet some delicious, locally grown, heirloom tomatoes. My yield was about 5 pounds of bacon which I sliced up into serving sized packages for the freezer.

(Sorry for the crappy photo – look at the earlier bacon post for some much better porn.)

Finally around mid-June, at the Maplewood Farmers’ Market, I spied a few first-of-the-season heirloom tomatoes. The farmer knew that he had gold that week. They were ridiculously But my bacon was waiting and my patience was non-existant. I had to have one, even though I cost me my right arm. Ugly, but perfect in texture, color and flavor this expensive tomato did not disappoint us.

Bacon and tomatoes this good, have to have just the right bread, don’t they? Since coming back from the CIA last spring, inspired by my new found bravery in the face of yeast, I have been making our breads at home. I learned several breads in class but the one I prefer by far is the one my classmate Jessica told me about. Apparently everybody in the world knew about this bread before me. But since I was leavening-challenged, I had been clueless before that class. The bread I am talking about is Jim Lahey’s No Knead bread. If you have always fantasized about homemade bread but didn’t have the desire or guts or both to deal with an involved multi-stepped process, I would urge you to take a look at this recipe. I have made many different variations on the basic no-knead version and I swear it never fails. Add herbs, dried grated cheese, chopped olives, sun-dried tomatoes and the basic bread yields to your creativity. I even made a rye version (I used a fine ground flour) that came out fantastically.

Looks like it came straight from a Paris boulanger, doesn’t it? This loaf comes out of the oven moist and yeasty on the inside and crisp and chewy on the crust. It is an amazing bread that makes for some truly ecstatic eating. Bob always likes his toasted and this bread is both crunchy and soft out of our Dualit.

Summer dinners have regularly consisted of a big, thick, well stuffed BLT. For the “L,” we use baby lettuce from my little hydroponic garden supplemented by fresh radish sprouts from that same farmers’ market. These lovelies add an element of spice to our sandwiches. I would show you how beautiful one of these gourmet dinners is but we never seem to be able to wait to take a photo before devouring our meal.

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Filed under Baking, Bread, Cooking, Farmers Market, Pork

Short Ribs: Nothing Short of Fabulous

I have been working with the Sous Vide Supreme  since last February and I continue to be amazed at how great most of what I produce using this gadget. That having been said, let’s just face the truth: this machine is a complete luxury. There is nothing I have cooked with it that can’t be cooked conventionally. It is also true however that certain things come out of the SVS off-the-charts fabulous. So far, the short ribs I made recently top this list.

Short ribs are, IMHO, a fantastic food in their own right though they are also difficult to cook well. Absent an SVS or some other kind of sous vide rig (such as this one or this one), short ribs must be slow cooked using conventional means. This usually involves braising: a method which inherently removes flavor from its subject in order to obtain a desired tenderness and texture. The challenge then is to spice the braise in such a way as to impart some intensity back into the protein and, mostly, to sauce the final product so as to give the consumer back some of the flavor that was unavoidably removed in the cooking process. Take for example a traditional stew. Often made with plenty of aromatics such as onion, carrot, celery, garlic, and bay. But without all that sauce, the meat is otherwise rather dry and tasteless. It is often stringy, too. One of the beautiful things about sous vide cooking is that flavor does not leave the food for the water, as it does with a regular braise and, if cooked at the right temperature, the meat does not become stringy.

With all that fat surrounding it and nestled close to a bone, short rib meat actually has an astoundingly delicious natural flavor. In the sous vide cooking process, unless you cook meat at a high temperature (at least 70C/158F), the fat does not render out into the braising liquid, either. Instead it stays in place, moistening and tenderizing the meat all during the  cooking time. In addition, with sous vide cooking, even at a very low temp you are able to cook protein for a long enough time to precipitate the break down most of the collagen within without turning the protein to mush or, worse yet, string. This method results in a level of tenderness that cannot otherwise be achieved in normally tough cuts of meat. All the while, you can maintain the doneness of the meat by choosing a temperature low enough to leave it pink and juicy even after the hours required to break down the collagen.

I bagged my short ribs after patting them dry and sprinkling them with salt, white pepper, a little paprika and some garlic powder. Each rib got its own pouch.

I cooked them in the water oven for 72 hours at 55C/131F. That’s right 3 whole days the meat was swimming! The temperature I chose is the one generally used to obtain what I would call medium rare beef, though some might call it rare.

The above photo shows what the short ribs looked like after their 72 hour swim.

You can see that they are still very pink and you can also easily see why the fat had to be cut away. But let me tell you, that fat did its job. The texture of the meat was way beyond incredible. As usual, to make the dish more appealing, some browning was in order. I used my handy Iwatani Torch though a searing in a red-hot skillet would have worked just fine too.

Though I removed a great deal of the fat, this meat was beautifully marbled which meant that a quick searing produced a perfect crust. The fat left on the meat became crunchy while the juices carmelized on the outside My mouth was watering as I plated our meal.

When I took the meat from the pouches I had reserved the juices. This I cooked, strained and strained again. I enriched the clear liquid with a red wine reduction that I had flavored with mirepoix, minced garlic and spices. I added all this to some veal demi-glace and reduced it a little more. In the end I had a beautiful and rich sauce which I lightly ladled over the meat.

A while before dinner time, I took a bounty of summer vegetables which I had picked up at one of my favorite farmers’ markets and roasted them in the oven with a drizzle of olive oil and sea salt. Roasted turnips, baby summer squash, new potatoes and golden carrots made a beautiful rainbow on my plate.

Decadent? Absolutely. The meat had the look and richness of the finest prime rib but it was melt-in-your-mouth tender with a texture that I could not possibly do justice to in words. You simply have to try this if you can some day. No, I could not eat a meal like this with any frequency (though I would love to). But my oh my, we savored every bite we took with our eyes rolling back in amazement – it was truly a religious eating experience. We are not likely to forget this meal anytime soon!

Now consider this: short ribs are considered a cheap cut of meat! They are often reserved for soups or stews or the meat is removed and ground for burgers! If you really enjoy short ribs or other meats usually reserved for braises, put a sous vide rig on your wish list! You will find a new dimension!

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Filed under Cooking, Sous Vide, sous vide cooking, Sous Vide Supreme, water oven

Ah, there’s the rub…for pulled pork, that is.

A couple of my wonderful readers have recently asked me for my “recipe” for pork rub. You will find the recipe below and I want you all to know, that if ever you want a recipe from me, just write me and I will be happy to help out.

Actually, I have been meaning to have a discussion with you on the subject of recipes, so I am going to take this opportunity now.

You may have noticed that I do not generally post recipes. This is definitely NOT because I keep these things secret or because I am stingy in this way. I am more than happy to tell anyone how I prepared any particular dish, sauce, etc. and to give enough details to enable a person to duplicate my effort. The real truth about why I don’t post formal recipes is because I don’t very often use them! My cooking is an ongoing experiment and I always think it is a delightful miracle when I can duplicate a dish perfectly a multiple of times. My mom taught me how to cook early on and it was always about being there, at her side, watching. “A little bit of this and a handful of that” she would tell me. Taste and adjust, taste some more. This explains why I am not much of a baker – precision is my nemesis.

When I research how to cook something, I look at multiple sources. The internet is invaluable and I also have a sizeable cookbook collection (I can always use more). I try to find two or three recipes for something I am thinking of preparing. From these, I get ideas and guidance. I look at a recipe as a set of suggestions for seasonings, proportions, etc. Of course, I also get assistance about methodology – what is the right temperature to cook something at, should I braise or roast it, and so on. But, it is rare for me to really follow a recipe closely, unless I am baking. But, I don’t bake much! 

I do like to think of myself as a big time locavore. By limiting my cooking to mostly what is local and seasonal, often times something has to give with the ingredients, right? Ok, I admit, that is a bit of a cop-out. With many recipes, you can at least figure out what to substitute for what is not available. Certainly in this case a recipe can provide good guidance.

Ok, ok, no more chatter. Here is the pulled pork Rub:

  • 1 part ordinary chile powder
  • .5 part each of Ground cumin, good fresh smoked paprika
  • .25 parts each ground coriander, granulated onion powder
  • .12 parts each granulated garlic, white pepper, a combo of dried herbs including parsley, rubbed sage, cilantro, basil and oregano
  • Kosher salt, cayenne to taste – a little of each though be careful with the heat.
  • A teaspoon or two of dehydrated/granulated lemon zest – entirely optional

Mix or shake up these ingredients and give the mix a smell. Adjust the seasoning. Sprinkle the spice mixture generously on and rub into any kind of pork  for barbeque, crock pot or of course, sous vide cooking.

A couple of final notes: the smoked paprika I bought lately has a whole lot of heat so I left out the cayenne in my recent batch. But I have used some weaker stuff in the past so I pick it up with the cayenne. The rub mixture will keep for a year – I make it in batches of about 4-6 oz.

Someday I will realize my dream of having a bona fide recipe section on this blog. Until then, please don’t hesitate to let me know if you want any other recipes.

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Filed under Baking, Cooking, Education, Pork, Recipes, Seasoning