Tag Archives: torch

Short Ribs: Nothing Short of Fabulous

I have been working with the Sous Vide Supreme  since last February and I continue to be amazed at how great most of what I produce using this gadget. That having been said, let’s just face the truth: this machine is a complete luxury. There is nothing I have cooked with it that can’t be cooked conventionally. It is also true however that certain things come out of the SVS off-the-charts fabulous. So far, the short ribs I made recently top this list.

Short ribs are, IMHO, a fantastic food in their own right though they are also difficult to cook well. Absent an SVS or some other kind of sous vide rig (such as this one or this one), short ribs must be slow cooked using conventional means. This usually involves braising: a method which inherently removes flavor from its subject in order to obtain a desired tenderness and texture. The challenge then is to spice the braise in such a way as to impart some intensity back into the protein and, mostly, to sauce the final product so as to give the consumer back some of the flavor that was unavoidably removed in the cooking process. Take for example a traditional stew. Often made with plenty of aromatics such as onion, carrot, celery, garlic, and bay. But without all that sauce, the meat is otherwise rather dry and tasteless. It is often stringy, too. One of the beautiful things about sous vide cooking is that flavor does not leave the food for the water, as it does with a regular braise and, if cooked at the right temperature, the meat does not become stringy.

With all that fat surrounding it and nestled close to a bone, short rib meat actually has an astoundingly delicious natural flavor. In the sous vide cooking process, unless you cook meat at a high temperature (at least 70C/158F), the fat does not render out into the braising liquid, either. Instead it stays in place, moistening and tenderizing the meat all during the  cooking time. In addition, with sous vide cooking, even at a very low temp you are able to cook protein for a long enough time to precipitate the break down most of the collagen within without turning the protein to mush or, worse yet, string. This method results in a level of tenderness that cannot otherwise be achieved in normally tough cuts of meat. All the while, you can maintain the doneness of the meat by choosing a temperature low enough to leave it pink and juicy even after the hours required to break down the collagen.

I bagged my short ribs after patting them dry and sprinkling them with salt, white pepper, a little paprika and some garlic powder. Each rib got its own pouch.

I cooked them in the water oven for 72 hours at 55C/131F. That’s right 3 whole days the meat was swimming! The temperature I chose is the one generally used to obtain what I would call medium rare beef, though some might call it rare.

The above photo shows what the short ribs looked like after their 72 hour swim.

You can see that they are still very pink and you can also easily see why the fat had to be cut away. But let me tell you, that fat did its job. The texture of the meat was way beyond incredible. As usual, to make the dish more appealing, some browning was in order. I used my handy Iwatani Torch though a searing in a red-hot skillet would have worked just fine too.

Though I removed a great deal of the fat, this meat was beautifully marbled which meant that a quick searing produced a perfect crust. The fat left on the meat became crunchy while the juices carmelized on the outside My mouth was watering as I plated our meal.

When I took the meat from the pouches I had reserved the juices. This I cooked, strained and strained again. I enriched the clear liquid with a red wine reduction that I had flavored with mirepoix, minced garlic and spices. I added all this to some veal demi-glace and reduced it a little more. In the end I had a beautiful and rich sauce which I lightly ladled over the meat.

A while before dinner time, I took a bounty of summer vegetables which I had picked up at one of my favorite farmers’ markets and roasted them in the oven with a drizzle of olive oil and sea salt. Roasted turnips, baby summer squash, new potatoes and golden carrots made a beautiful rainbow on my plate.

Decadent? Absolutely. The meat had the look and richness of the finest prime rib but it was melt-in-your-mouth tender with a texture that I could not possibly do justice to in words. You simply have to try this if you can some day. No, I could not eat a meal like this with any frequency (though I would love to). But my oh my, we savored every bite we took with our eyes rolling back in amazement – it was truly a religious eating experience. We are not likely to forget this meal anytime soon!

Now consider this: short ribs are considered a cheap cut of meat! They are often reserved for soups or stews or the meat is removed and ground for burgers! If you really enjoy short ribs or other meats usually reserved for braises, put a sous vide rig on your wish list! You will find a new dimension!

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Filed under Cooking, Sous Vide, sous vide cooking, Sous Vide Supreme, water oven

Fanatic Found Fiddling with Fowl; aka DUCK, Part 2

A few posts ago, I showed you box containing a cooler full of duck  that I found on my doorstep one day. Well, I didn’t really find it, I ordered it from HVFG without having the foggiest idea of what I was going to do with it once I had it. A number of folks congratulated me on my purchases, and one person even expressed duck envy, but no one came up with any suggestions for what I ought to do with all or any part of this booty.

Oh, what’s that you say? I am supposed to tell you what to do with it. Moi?

Well, for future reference, if while reading about my culinary exploits you find yourself thinking “I would have done something like this …, or “why doesn’t she just do…”, please feel free to leave a nice comment. (“Hey, stupid” is not gonna fly for me.) Kathy recently did just that (left a nice, polite and informative comment) on Pi day and I very much appreciated it!

Nevertheless, it is my little red wagon so I guess I am going to have to push or pull it myself. And so, ladies and gentlemen, without further ado, I give you the first sous vide DUCK BREAST I ever cooked (drum roll):

 OK, it was fairly crappy, IMHO. I cooked it too long and too hot. It was in the SVS for 4 hours at 59C (138.2 F). It was just a little too well done, at least for me since I like my duck on the more rare side and this was decidedly medium. Additionally, it was not the right texture. I could tell that I had cooked it for too long because it was too tender. It was not quite mushy like the expensive, grass-fed flank steak I destroyed, but it completely lost its steak/meat-like quality. 

My family, including my sweet, adorable, darling, teenaged, step-daughter, who is the pickiest eater on the planet, didn’t notice. Hubby and she ate it quite happily. I think it was the cherry and honey demi-glace together with the crispy, bacon like skin that I garnished it with. I will tell you how to make that below. I served a rocket salad with watercress on the side. It looks terrible in this photo. But trust me, it was not drenched with dressing or wilting as it appears. Note to self: don’t dress the greens before the photo, simply spray them a tiny bit to get a shine. I actually used a delicious, very mild lemon juice and olive oil emulsion to dress the greens, which was a nice complement to the rich duck and its sweet sauce.

Anyway, live and learn.

The second duck was, if I do say so myself, divine. Bob took a bite and I watched as his eyes rolled back in his head in a foodgasmic state. He said he would have gladly paid the big bucks for this duck in a restaurant. So here, for your enjoyment is the food porn with a little bit of explanation:

Preparing duck breast for sous vide

 I removed the skin from the breast meat. It was easy to do. All I had to do was carefully pull it away. In a couple of places I had to use my handy-dandy boning knife to help me out, but not much. I reserved the skin, wrapped in plastic, in the fridge. 

I cooked the duck this time around in the SVS at 57.5 C (135F) for one hour and 15 minutes. This was exactly right, as it turns out. It came out perfectly medium rare and it retained its steak-like quality. There was nothing tough or chewy about this duck, it was plenty tender and easy to chew. But you definitely knew you were eating some good meat.

When the duck breast was ready I took it out of the bag and patted it dry with a paper towel. Now this is the exciting part. I already told you that I am a serious apparataphilliac (pronounced: ap-uh-rat-uh-fil-lee-ak). I especially love kitchen gadgets. So, for the first time, I got to use my new blow torch. It was quite the thrill as you might imagine!

Food comes out of the vacuum bag and water bath cooked evenly, all the way through. No one part is more done than another because NOTHING can get hotter than the temp of the water. It’s brilliant! This, to my mind, is the number one benefit of this cute toy.

However, we the eating public have a preference for food, in particular protein, to have a nice “crust” on the outside, an area that has been carmelized or “browned” as my mother used to say. This is called the Maillard Reaction and it is all about a complex chemical change that occurs when you touch food with high heat. I highly recommend you read Dr. Baldwin or Harold McGee, if you really want to know more about this. Suffice it for me to say here that there are several ways you can accomplish this.

The easiest and simplest is to just heat up a good heavy skillet with a light coating of some neutral, high smoke-point oil (I like grape seed, Thomas Keller  likes canola) and toss that baby in the pan on the “show side” for no longer than a minute. Just don’t do your tossing until the oil barely begins to smoke (then, watch that sucker like a hawk) because you will risk overcooking the protein – the precise problem of using the skillet. You don’t want to do that, now do you, since you spent so much time and money figuring out how to cook it evenly throughout, sous vide in your water oven?

Another way to get the Maillard reaction is to use just the right tool (aka gadget). This is where my endorphins kick in, big time. There are a number of different kinds of torches you can use for this purpose, mine is the Iwatani Pro. This is the guy they use in the big leagues. Don’t bother with those namby-pamby creme brulee torches (wanna buy mine from me) they work only for that one purpose and they don’t really do that too well, either. And besides, the big (well, more like medium) Bertha is much more fun!

So, here is the finished result, after slicing but before it was plated:

This time I served it with a much milder, not so overwhelming, sauce. I made it from a very hearty clear chicken stock I had on hand. To the stock I added miripoix (that’s French for diced carrots, celery and onion which gets sautéed in a little butter) and a sachet (that’s French for a little bag) of a sprig of parsley, a sprig of thyme, some peppercorns, a couple of cloves and a bay leaf) and reduced the liquid by half. Next, I added some blueberry syrup (I made that last summer from hand picked blueberries and sugar). While that was reducing, I carmelized a shallot, deglazed it with Cointreau and then strained in the reduction. I strained the sauce one more time to get rid of the little shallot pieces and voila! The veggies you see are parsnips glazed with nutmeg infused brown butter and haricots vert. I got the inspiration for the parsnips from one of the many wonderful food blogs I read. Here it is plated and sauced and ready for feasting on.

Now, finally, I’ll tell you about the crispy skin I garnished the otherwise healthy and very low-fat duck breast with. I dried that sucker off again real well with a paper towel and rubbed it down with my favorite-for-duck Chinese 5 spice. I scored it in a diamond pattern and placed it in a skillet with bacon press on top, turned on the fire and let it rock. Watching it very carefully as it turned the entire stove top into a greasy mess, I fried that skin until it was just like crispy bacon. The whole piece of skin was crisp and most of the fat was rendered off. I drained the skin between more paper towels, weighting it down once again with the still hot bacon press (wiped off) until I was ready to cut it into strips for the garnish. Really, this was just to keep it warm. The end result was unctuous, yummy, deliciousness in a small enough quantity (it’s just a garnish, after all) to keep you from feeling too guilty. Bon appetit!

Soon come, mon: Chicken pot pie?

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Filed under Cooking, Duck, kitchen tools, Sous Vide, sous vide cooking, Sous Vide Failures, Sous Vide Supreme, water oven